Filtering by: Evening Lecture

American Honor: The Creation of the Nation’s Ideals during the Revolutionary Era
Nov
8
6:30 PM18:30

American Honor: The Creation of the Nation’s Ideals during the Revolutionary Era

Presented by Craig Bruce Smith*

In this lecture, Smith reveals how the American Revolution was not only for liberty and freedom, but also a revolution of ethics; reshaping what colonial Americans understood as “honor” and “virtue.” Smith will highlight prominent Americans who came of age before and during the Revolution, linking it to an ethical transformation, and sparking the American Revolution.

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Nathan Hale and Moses Dunbar: Choosing Sides in the American Revolution
Jul
19
6:30 PM18:30

Nathan Hale and Moses Dunbar: Choosing Sides in the American Revolution

Presented by Virginia Anderson*

Nathan Hale, hanged as a spy by the British, is remembered as a Revolutionary hero. Moses Dunbar, executed as a loyalist traitor to the state of Connecticut, is virtually unknown. Despite their divergent historical reputations, Anderson considers how their stories are not so different, and together can illuminate important features of the impact of the Revolution on ordinary lives.

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Scars of Independence
May
10
6:30 PM18:30

Scars of Independence

Presented by Holger Hoock*

Although the American Revolution is often portrayed as an orderly, restrained rebellion, with brave patriots defending their noble ideals against an oppressive empire, author Holger Hoock finds that the Revolution was not only a high-minded battle over principles, but also a profoundly violent civil war—one that shaped the nation, and the British Empire, in ways we have only begun to understand.

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Thomas Jefferson-Revolutionary: A Radical's Struggle to Remake America
Apr
26
6:30 PM18:30

Thomas Jefferson-Revolutionary: A Radical's Struggle to Remake America

Presented by Kevin R.C. Gutzman*

This lecture was originally scheduled for Thursday, April 19. Please note the date change. We apologize for any inconvenience.

In this lecture, Gutzman argues that Thomas Jefferson should be remembered more for his success as a constructive statesman than for his authorship of the Declaration of Independence.

Purchase tickets here.

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First Founding Father: Richard Henry Lee and the Call to Independence*
Feb
22
6:30 PM18:30

First Founding Father: Richard Henry Lee and the Call to Independence*

Presented by Harlow Giles Unger

Unger will describe the life and career of Richard Henry Lee, the first Founding Father to call for American Independence from Britain. Learn about how Lee masterminded the political and diplomatic victories that ensured Washington’s military victory.

Purchase tickets here.

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*Fatal Sunday: George Washington, the Monmouth Campaign, and the Politics of Battle
Oct
12
6:30 PM18:30

*Fatal Sunday: George Washington, the Monmouth Campaign, and the Politics of Battle

The Battle of Monmouth, fought on June 28, 1778, was a brutal tactical draw. George Washington's partisans spun a public relations victory that enabled the General to silence the army and political critics who had challenged his command the previous winter in the so-called Conway Cabal. Thus the battle was contested on two fronts- the military and political, both with grave results for Washington and the Revolution. 

*Fatal Sunday: George Washington, the Monmouth Campaign, and the Politics of Battle is a Fraunces Tavern Museum Book Award 2017 Honorable Mention.

Purchase tickets here.

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*The Spoils of War
Sep
7
6:30 PM18:30

*The Spoils of War

Presented by Alastair Smith & Bruce Bueno de Mesquita
Doors open at 6pm

Even America’s greatest presidents, like Washington, Madison, Lincoln, and FDR fought wars to advance their personal interests. War presidents are much more likely to be re-elected than those who produced peace and prosperity. Find out how we can eliminate needless wars through simple procedural changes.

*The Spoils of War: Greed, Power, and the Conflicts that made our Greatest Presidents, is a Fraunces Tavern Museum Book Club selection.

September 7 Lecture
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Making the Common Cause
Aug
3
6:30 PM18:30

Making the Common Cause

Presented by Robert Parkinson
Doors open at 6pm

The issue of unity between the thirteen colonies was essential but fragile. The leaders of the Revolutionary movement had to craft an argument that compelled as many colonists as possible to support their side. Historians have emphasized that they did this by stressing liberty, consent, and freedom. However, the “Common Cause” had a dark side, one with significant implications about race and belonging in the U.S that lasted long after Yorktown. 

August 3 Lecture
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Evening Lecture
Jul
6
6:30 PM18:30

Evening Lecture

Mutiny on the Hermione and the Presidential Election of 1800

Presented by A. Roger Ekirch
Doors open at 6:00pm

In 1797, the Royal Navy suffered the bloodiest mutiny in the annals of British history, which led to the extradition from America and the hanging by the British, of a purported American sailor, Jonathan Robbins. Widely overlooked by historians, Robbins’ martyrdom provoked a popular uproar and a constitutional crisis over presidential authority that inflamed the tumultuous campaign of 1800.

July 6 Lecture
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Apr
20
6:30 PM18:30

Beyond the Christian Nation: Religion and the Founding of the United States

McBride will describe the actual role religion played in the founding of the United States by examining the political activism of clergymen during the Revolution and in the Early Republic. Why did many clergymen oppose the Revolution and the Constitution on religious grounds? How did political leaders use religious rhetoric to obtain and maintain power? The answers to these questions will fundamentally change the way we understand America’s political and cultural origins.

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